Founded at the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania

The Radiotherapy Comparative Effectiveness Consortium’s National Pragmatic Randomized Trial of Proton Therapy vs. Photon Therapy for Breast Cancer

Radcomp

DESCRIPTION
The RadComp Study, short for Radiotherapy Comparative Effectiveness, is a clinical study comparing two FDA approved radiation therapies — PHoton Therapy vs. PRoton Therapy — for the treatment of breast cancer and enrolls at over 70 radiation therapy practice sites nationwide. With this study, we hope to better understand the best available technologies for breast cancer to help patients live a longer, healthier life. RadComp employs innovative approaches to enhance real world data and evidence and behavioral economics-informed strategies to accelerate enrollment, retention, and compliance.

IMPACT
RadComp is the largest and fastest enrolling randomized trial of proton and photon therapy in the National Cancer Institute’s portfolio of trials and has received recognition for its novel patient and practice site engagement strategies.

PEOPLE
Justin E. Bekelman, MD; Susan Ellenberg, PhD; Bonnie Ky, MD, MSCE; Hien Lu; Ashley Feriozzi; Carolyn Hencek; Dana Goodlett; Amy Berrington, PhD, National Cancer Institute; Walter Bosch, DSc, Washington University; Oren Cahlon, MD, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Cynthia Chauhan, RadComp and FDA Patient Representative; Elizabeth Hahn, Northwestern University; Shannon MacDonald, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital; Daniel Mullins, PhD, University of Maryland; Mark Pankuch, PhD, Northwestern University; Stephanie Pugh, PhD, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Foundation; and Nicholas Remmes, PhD, Mayo Clinic.

PARTNERS
Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Foundation, the University of Maryland, Washington University St. Louis, the National Cancer Institute, and over 70 enrolling proton therapy and photon therapy centers nationwide.

FUNDING
Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute and the National Cancer Institute

FOCUS
Clinical Transformation
Incentives to Change Behavior

MEDIA
Twitter: @TheRadCompStudy
Facebook: TheRadCompStudy
Wall Street Journal:  You’ve Survived Cancer. What Comes Next?
As more patients are treated successfully, doctors and researchers are focusing more on helping people navigate the difficult, often lonely years after treatment.

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